An Aging Life Care Specialist Goes Underground

An Aging Life Care Specialist Goes Underground

We Aging Life Care specialists ask a lot of questions. Most pertain to the medical, social, emotional and the home environment. Now we are going even deeper in the home and descending to the basement.

Why the basement you ask? Because in some homes, across all fifty states, evil may be leaking from the ground. It’s colorless, odorless, invisible and can only be detected by testing. This mysterious element is called radon. It is a radioactive gas that comes from the decay of uranium found in the soil one’s house is built on. It typically moves up through the foundation to the air and enters one’s home through cracks, walls, construction joints or gaps in the foundation around pipes. A home traps radon inside, where it can build up. The ventilation and the air flow patterns in a house will affect how much radon will be pulled into different areas of the house. The age of the home, does not make a difference. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers in the United States. The higher the radon level in a house, and the longer the exposure period, the greater the risk to the occupants.

Apologies for the scare, but the good news is that radon levels can be measured and if remediation is necessary, there are solutions. The place to start is with A Citizen’s Guide to Radon, published by the EPA. In a nutshell, the average radon concentration for homes in the United States is 1.3. It is when the radon levels, goes beyond 2 picoCuries per liter (the EPA will explain the jargon) that thought should be given to resolving the potential problem. While you can hire a professional tester to determine the radon level, you can easily start with buying a do it yourself test kit available in hardware stores or online. You can also call: 1-800-SOS-RADON (part of the EPA). This testing method consists of a small charcoal canister. The radon in the air is absorbed on the charcoal and the decay products can then be measured by a laboratory. The laboratory cost is usually incorporated in the cost of the canister. It is suggested by the New York State Department of Health, that two separate charcoal canister measurements be used before deciding to correct the situation. If mitigation is necessary the most common method is to have a vent pipe system and fan installed, which pulls radon from beneath the house and vents it to the outside. More information is available from the EPA at 1-800-55RADON.

So, why this article on radon? This past January was officially declared Radon Awareness month. But beyond this, often, as Aging Life Care specialists, we turn to our personal experiences when they can enhance the lives of those we help. Some years ago, with great excitement we closed on our dream weekend home in the woods. Surrounded by nature, deer leaping thru the woods beyond, a welcoming lake for rowing and swimming, what could be better? The answer would have been a tent for camping had we not taken care of the high radon level that was noted in the inspection report. As Aging Life Care specialists, it is our goal to keep our clients safe at home. Checking for radon is another step to ensure their safety.

Making Your Bed and Other Strategies for Lessening Caregiver Stress

Making Your Bed and Other Strategies for Lessening Caregiver Stress

Covid-19 has thrust many of us into new or expanding caregiving roles. Medication management, arranging doctors’ appointments virtual and otherwise, making sure a senior is eating more than tea and crackers, and doing our best to ensure our elders feel connected in a world where quarantine and isolation have been the keywords of these last nine months.

Alongside these caregiving responsibilities, we have family and work commitments and, yes, an obligation to keep ourselves healthy. While the initial reports are promising for vaccines, we are still awaiting that GPS to give us clear and consistent direction.  While waiting for those directions to appear, I would like to share five strategies to help you, the caregiver, lessen the stress that accompanies the increased role you may be assuming:

  • Accept the feelings that come with this time. Your anxiety doesn’t have to control you when everything around you feels so uncertain. Focus on what you can control: you, your thoughts, your actions. Speak with those friends who offer you reassurance and comfort and let the other incoming calls go to voice mail, especially when those unsolicited advice-givers are on the other end.
  • Have an emergency contingency plan. Try to organize what the National Alliance of Caregiving calls a “care squad” or simply a caring support team that can help in the care of a loved one in the event you become ill. Identify trusted people who can provide help such as bringing over groceries, picking up medications, offering technical guidance for virtual doctors’ appointments, and making those all-important outreach calls to a parent.
  • Practice self-talk. Remind yourself that you have coped with difficult situations before and think back to how you handled them. Re-discover that strength and confidence. Extend to yourself the empathy that you would impart to a friend in need.
  • Stay in the present, ask yourself: “What do I have to deal with right now?” “What can I control right now?” Think about all the times you worried about the future and the outcome was not as dismal as you imagined it would be.
  • Stick to a routine. As Gretchen Rubin speaks of in her book The Happiness Project, start your day by making your bed. You may say why do that, I’m just going to unmake it at night? Making your bed sets the tone for the day, it takes little effort and goes a long way in making order out of chaos. Holding on to a routine brings a sense of normalcy during very abnormal times.

Finally, some years ago at a tag sale, I picked up a small 4X4 framed piece of embroidered needlework, never knowing how relevant it would be for these times. It reads: “Long is Not Forever.”  I hope you will hold on to those words as I do.

The Art of Listening: Achieving Successful Communication

The Art of Listening: Achieving Successful Communication

As Aging Life Care specialists, we are called upon to provide an assortment of services. The needs are as varied as the families we are helping. We continuously strive to be experts in our knowledge of homecare, entitlements, senior residences, elder law attorneys, and providing skilled and supportive counseling. But we are only effective if, throughout our dialogue with families, we listen. Effective listening combined with effective communication sets the foundation for successive and successful outcomes.

The art of listening, sometimes referred to as “active listening” requires two essential tasks. First, that we as care managers, listen, making a mindful effort to hear the words that seniors and their families are saying. Second, we must concentrate on what is being said establishing a virtual stop sign that leaves no room for our own assumptions and prejudices. We cannot assume or anticipate conclusions. With these two tasks as starting points, our listening is enhanced by four other components.

We listen mindfully, putting aside any distracting (as opposed to professional beliefs) thoughts. We listen without having an inner dialogue that will have an automatic response to a situation that is verbally evolving.

We listen without interrupting, knowing it may disrupt a client’s train of thought, especially if the person is cognitively compromised. A semi-smile (think Mona Lisa) or an encouraging “uh-huh,” lets the person know we are with them, we are listening.

We ask for clarification at the appropriate time. Siblings may finish telling of their conflicting feelings about what they each think is best for mom, and we reply: “So let me make sure I understand.” It is that clarification that allows for modification and affirmation.

Finally, after all information has been shared, the Aging Life Care specialist summarizes what has been said and listens for what has not been said, the latter perhaps a clue to the issue at hand.

Our listening skills remain strong as we adapt to the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 virus. Historically, families have sought the guidance of an Aging Life Care specialist as they pondered whether a parent would be better served in assisted living or remain at home with help. Now, families are asking our guidance as they question if a parent should return home or remain in their senior residence. Whoever would have thought? Thru this crisis, we will stand strong with our families, listening deeply and fully, a north star during uncertain times.

New Help in Choosing a Nursing Home

New Help in Choosing a Nursing Home

Selecting a nursing home here in Westchester County, or beyond, is filled with a myriad of emotions. Sometimes the decision is made easier by the fact that the complexity of care needed can only be met in a nursing home. Other times, it is the exhaustion experienced by the caregiver that necessitates entering a nursing home. And still, other times it is for rehabilitation and the stay is short term.

Regardless of the scenario, the process of selecting a nursing home can be daunting. Many times, the person is in the hospital and the discharge planner will hand a family member a list of nursing homes and ask them to select three. You may well know three great Italian restaurants in the area, but nursing homes are a different story. Over the years, as an elder care consultant, I have learned the good, bad and ugly about the residences in Westchester County and have guided families accordingly.

In conjunction with my assistance, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provides a helpful guide in the form of Nursing Home Compare. This five-star quality-based system, not unlike how hotels are rated, allows a person to compare various factors that, in their totality, lead to a better level of care and consequently a higher star rating.

Enhancing the need for consumers to learn as much as they can before selecting a nursing home, in October of 2019, CMS announced that it would add a new icon which is a red circle with a white stop hand in the center. This icon, seen below, alerts the researcher that the nursing home has been cited for abuse which has caused resident harm within the past year. Their star rating will be capped at two stars and only if the facility goes without an abuse citation for one year will the icon be removed.

While the abuse icon is another step to motivate nursing homes to look at the quality of care they are providing, experience has taught me that the absence of an abuse icon does not necessarily mean the absence of abuse. Visit at off-hours, smell, observe and talk to staff and residents. A difficult decision can be made a little easier.

Nursing Home Abuse Icon

 

End of Life Decisions: A Broken Promise

End of Life Decisions: A Broken Promise

As a geriatric care manager, in the early part of my journey with senior adults and their families, I ask about advanced directives: a living will, power of attorney and a health care proxy. There will be one of three responses: 1. No, my mother refuses to talk about these documents. 2. We are planning to go to an attorney or 3. Yes, there has been a designated POA and health care agent.

If you fall into the number three category, it may be with relief that you have these documents in place. As the health care agent, you have had the “discussion” and understand the wishes of the person you will represent. You are certain that you can march forward through the complexities of end of life decision making. Yet for some, when the time arrives, that confidence becomes clouded by doubt. It’s not unusual. Such was the case for Lorraine, Anne’s daughter.

Anne, my client of nearly five years, confided in me with weekly regularity that she wanted to die. She knew she was losing her memory and was humiliated by what was happening. Other indignities followed. An extremely anxious person, the only comfort she took was that Lorraine knew her wishes and would do right by her.

Lorraine did not visit her mother with any frequency despite living just over the Westchester County border in Connecticut, a thirty-minute trip. Watching these meager visits and equally few telephone calls, I was sure that when Anne’s doctor called Lorraine to suggest hospice care, she would readily agree. To my surprise, Lorraine would not acquiesce. She acknowledged to me that she knew what she was supposed to do as her mother’s agent. The problem was she could not bring herself to make those final decisions about stopping advanced medical treatment, nutrition, and hydration. “Who am I to make those decisions?” she said to me. I wondered, was it unspoken hope or unease?

Anne lingered with time becoming the final decision-maker. In the days before Anne’s death, I said to Lorraine, with no suggestion of judgment, that she would carry with her whatever decision she made. I recognized that those who generously take on the role of health care agent do so with a full heart. But sometimes, good intentions can be superseded by last-minute questioning. Doubt fogs the road we thought we could readily take.

ADL’s and IADL’s: The Alphabet of Assessing an Adult Senior

ADL’s and IADL’s: The Alphabet of Assessing an Adult Senior

Where does this geriatric care manager start when a family is eager to help an aging parent?  The answer is an assessment. It is a bevy of questions that are asked to determine how best to approach the issues at hand. Some of the questions I ask are unique to the situation, but others are basic: Activities of Daily Living aka ADL’s and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living aka IADL.

Activities of Daily Living tell about an adult senior’s ability for self-care. Is a parent able to feed herself? This does not include preparing a meal or even chewing or swallowing the food, it is bringing food to one’s mouth. Dress and undressing without assistance, from underwear to shirt and tie.  Toileting: is the older adult able to ambulate independently or with a walker or wheelchair to the toilet?  Transferring:  can the person independently move from one place to another, from a bed to a chair?  Personal hygiene: can an older person bathe themselves, brush their hair, their teeth?

While the Activities of daily living provide a gauge as to whether an adult can live safely on their own, the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, are also of important consideration. IADL’s include the ability to manage money this would include paying bills in a timely manner. The ability to go grocery shopping or to use a food delivery service. Getting to and from doctors’ appointments.  Household chores including doing laundry, hand washed or otherwise, and selective house cleaning.

Beyond these two significant areas, an assessment will look at the finances of the older adult to determine if there can be alternate living arrangements or home care paid for privately or thru an entitlement program. Knowing about family support within the geographic area in which the older adult resides is important. The role that can be played by adult children living at a distance. The physical, emotional and cognitive conditions the senior may be confronting, and the ability to take the corresponding medications responsibly. The “story” of the senior’s life. Personality traits, occupation, significant events that may influence how best to approach a parent. Who might it be in the family or beyond the family that may have the greatest chance of influencing the senior?

By combining responses to ADL’s, IADL’s, and the topics discussed above, this geriatric care manager can help families take the first step to bringing a parent to a healthier and safer way of living.  To this end, health care directives and a power of attorney should be in place to ensure that next steps can be taken without complications.