From Hospital to Home:  Post Hospital Syndrome

From Hospital to Home: Post Hospital Syndrome

Recently I addressed the Post-Acute Care Continuum in White Plains, New York. An organization whose goal is to educate and share best practices in post-acute care and care transitions. I was asked to speak about how geriatric care managers can help to ensure that patients return home and remain home beyond the initial 30-day period. Of course, we do not want our clients to return to the hospital at any time, but there is a reason for the specific 30 days.  In 2013, the United States Department of Health started to penalize hospitals for re-admission of patients within thirty days. The Department of Health wanted patients to be discharged responsibly with adequate follow-up care, hence this law was enacted.

Because of this act, the rate of 30-day re-admission has dropped from 20% to 17%. But often, while the reason for hospitalization has been addressed, the consequences of a hospitalization are just being felt when our clients return home. Dr. Harlan Krumholtz, MD of Yale-New Haven Hospital refers to this return as the Post Hospital Syndrome. He attributes this re-admission within 30 days to five major factors:

  1. Sleep deprivation: The patient is in a new environment. The illness combined with being in a different bed, in a different place will impact on cognitive and physical performance. A situation of perpetual jet lag has been created.
  2. Malnourishment: Certain tests and procedures require nothing by mouth for the day or evening prior. And if the test is cancelled and then rescheduled, another period goes by without nutrition. This results in protein-energy malnutrition. The consequences of such a scenario is that wound healing is impaired, there is a chance of increased infection and one’s immune system is compromised.
  3. Pain and discomfort: For any of us, especially those dealing with pain in the hospital environment, pain can lead to sleep disruption, mood disturbance, impaired cognitive functioning and may also impact on the immune system.
  4. Altering medications: Stopping one medication and adding another can have its impact on cognition and physical functioning: too much of a medication, too little, the wrong medication, an allergic reaction to a medication. A patient’s body becomes a roller coaster of experimentation in an effort to cure.
  5. Deconditioning: Time in bed for rest can put a patient at greater risk of accidents and falls. While physical therapy may take place in the hospital, Dr. Krumholtz questions if there is still too much inactivity. The result being once the patient returns home he or she is at greater risk for developing blood clots.

As discharge approaches, what must be done is a TOTAL evaluation of the patient. This evaluation should go beyond the reason for hospitalization. Attention must be given to sleep, nutrition, activity, strength and how all symptoms are treated and managed. As a geriatric care manager, it is my responsibility to observe, question and advocate for clients whose care has been entrusted to me.